In My Shoes, 2014 Edition

A blast from the past. I’m flaring HARD right now, and working on a few new posts. But this one, posted first 3+ years ago, feels appropriate to share today. Here are a few new things to add to the below list:

– To explain your illness to new work colleagues?
– To constantly tweak your diet in an attempt to find some relief?
– To spend extra time and money on Eastern medicine and physical therapy every month?
– To plan everything down to the minute in an effort to keep yourself out of a flare?
– To do everything “right”, and end up flat on your back fighting through excruciating pain and fatigue?

I’m sure there are lots more. What would you add?


Have you ever imagined how it would feel:

– To require an assistive device to open a jar?
– To be unable to grip a pen or a fork?
– To ask for a child’s help opening a toothpaste tube or bottle of water?
– To be stuck inside a room because you can’t turn a traditional doorknob?
– To cancel plans with friends because you hurt too much to get out of bed?
– To pack a cane every time you leave the house, just in case?
– To shop for a wheelchair as backup for days when you can’t walk at all?
– To eat healthy foods and gain weight uncontrollably because of the drugs you take?
– To inject yourself with medications weekly?
– To require a seat for your shower?
– To purchase a “days of the week” pill sorter to keep track of your meds?
– To endure stares and comments when you park in a disabled spot, because you don’t “look” sick?
– To be unable to move when you awaken each morning?
– To endure a monthly IV infusion for the rest of your life?
– To smile through tears when you encounter a firm handshake or embrace?
– To be unable to wear half the shoes in your closet because the heels are higher than 1”?
– To regularly face drug side effects, including headaches and bouts of nausea?
– To battle extreme fatigue on a daily basis?
– To watch from the sidelines while your child plays in the park?
– To be told you’re too young to have arthritis?

I never did, until I was diagnosed.  Now, these “imaginings” are my daily reality.  I put it all in perspective by remembering my blessings, but I won’t lie.  It’s a constant struggle.  If you know someone with RA, please remember to put yourself in our (very sensible and flat :)) shoes.  Awareness begins when our friends and family understand how this disease impacts every facet of our everyday lives.


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